Adult Physical Therapy 2017-03-30T15:49:33+00:00

Adult Physical Therapy

Physical therapists work with individuals who are experiencing difficulty with physical movement, including difficulty walking, muscle weakness, muscle paralysis, loss of independence and balance deficits. Often these deficits are caused by a neurological disorder or disease. These include CVA (stroke), Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), and Spinal cord injury. Physical therapy is also required by the geriatric population as they go through normal adult aging. These include (but are not limited to) arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and balance disorders. Geriatric physical therapists develop individualized program to help restore mobility, reduce pain and increase fitness.

At Temecula Valley Therapy Services, all patients receive an initial evaluation. This evaluation includes a review of the patient’s medical history, a review of the patient’s symptoms, and PT diagnostic tests and measurements. An individual plan of care is developed which includes the goals, planned treatment interventions, proposed frequency and duration of therapy required to attain the goals, and discharge plans as determined by the therapist.

Frequently Asked Questions

Neurological injuries are problems associated with the central nervous system, primarily the brain and spinal cord. People with neurologic injuries or impairments often require more hands on treatment and longer recovery times. We provide intensive rehabilitation for clients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, MS, Parkinson’s disease and spinal cord injury among other diagnosis.

Normal aging does not require physical therapy, however many of the conditions associated with osteoporosis, fear of falling, limited walking ability and deconditioning/weakness are not normal aging and can be addressed through skilled physical therapy. Additionally, our staff is aware of the issues with hearing loss, decreased vision and loss of sensation that can complicate rehabilitation for many older adults.

Geriatric physical therapy covers numerous issues concerning people as they go through normal adult aging. These include (but are not limited to) arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and balance disorders. Geriatric physical therapists develop individualized program to help restore mobility, reduce pain and increase fitness.

These includes CVA (stroke), Parkinson’s disease, Multiple sclerosis, ALS, Tramatic Brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury to name a few. Common problems of patients with neurological disorders include muscle weakness, paralysis, difficulty walking, functional and balance deficits and loss of independence. Therapists work with patients to improve areas of dysfunction.

Neurological physical therapists work with individuals who have neurological disorder or disease.

Please bring any copies of evaluations from specialists and other therapists that would assist the therapist in coordinating care and determining goals of therapy.

Please bring any equipment that you may use, such as, crutches, walker, wheelchair, braces/splints, or communication device.

At your initial evaluation appointment, please bring your doctor’s prescription, any applicable insurance referral and your insurance card.

The physical therapy evaluation is a documentation employed by a physical therapist during the first encounter with the patient. It is also called “initial examination or initial evaluation.” It is completed in one visit and takes about an hour.

Included in the PT initial evaluation are the following:

Examination
This includes information obtained from history, review of systems, PT diagnostic tests and measurements.

Diagnosis
Here, the level of impairment, activity or mobility and any participation restriction is indicated as determined by the physical therapist.

Prognosis
This part may include documentation of the predicted level of improvement (goals) that may be attained through the proposed treatment interventions. It also includes the duration or amount of time required to reach those goals. Prognosis documentation is usually included in the plan of care and is not necessarily a separate document.

Plan of Care
The plan of care of the initial evaluation or examination is usually stated in general terms. It includes the goals, which are stated in measurable terms; planned treatment interventions; proposed frequency and duration of therapy required to attain the goals; and discharge plans as determined by the therapist.